Quick & Easy Jabots: Variations on a Theme

A jabot is a ruffle or frill that is worn at the neckline and is typically made of lace.  They can either be ruffles on either side of the shirt opening, or a separate piece.   They are a quick way to add a period feel to an outfit.

Our high school does some costume rentals  and we had a group request a few more jabots that we had in stock so I decided to whip a few up.  One of the shows on our list of possibilities for the musical next year is a period show . . . so this might be a head start on costuming!

Pillow Sham Jabot:

I love pre-ruffled lace and eyelet.  Why not take advantage of having most of the work already done?  I had recently purchased this pillow sham for 50 cents, so it seemed like the perfect item to upcycle.

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I started by cutting out a roughly rectangular shape.  I took care to cut the eyelet carefully and keep the fullness intact.  I finished the raw edges with some zig-zag stitches.

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A pinking shears was used to cut the eyelet trim from around the edge of the sham.

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Strips were layered across the base fabric and sewn in place.

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Done:

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The top edge was folded over to make a casing.  I used twill tape and 1/2 strips of velcro to make an adjustable closure.

I was reasonably happy with this first one, but there were a few things I wasn’t satisfied with.  I had an awful lot of threads that wanted to fray along the edges.  I also found the layers of eyelet to be rather fly away.  I ended up going back and hemming the sides of the eyelet and then tacking them down part way, just to make the whole thing neater.

One refinement that I made for the second one included folding the edges of the base piece over to make a narrow hem.  The other thing I did was to sew the eyelet on a bit more to begin with.  I turned the edges under and hemmed them, and then I sewed the strips on as shown below.  The sides are sewn down about 1/2 way on each side, with an “up-across-down” stitching line.

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I also made sure to add a row of stitching to hold the neck band in place.

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I was able to get three jabots out of one standard size pillow sham.

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That makes them less than 25 cents each!    These are modestly gathered.  If you wanted something fuller, it would be a simple matter to use longer strips of the edging and gather them as they are sewn on to the base fabric.  By the time I did the last one, this was a 15-20 minute job 🙂

Lace Scarf Jabot:

The eyelet was nice, but I wanted to make some with lace.  I thought I would try using a lace crochet scarf.  (This is a picture of a piece I had left from decorating a hat).

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Version 1, the first attempt:

To make the base, I used a piece of the pillow sham.  To give it a bit more support, I backed the jabot-support fabric with a piece of 6″ petticoat net, hemming the sides.

For this version, I sewed the lace scarf on by untwisting the scarf.  This takes a bit of patience, but once you get started, it goes fairly easily.  The top is still twisted, but the lace all falls to one side.

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I did it with a continuous strip of lace.  I sewed across the lace, and then up the fabric, flipping the lace around to go back the other direction.

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When I was done, it looked like this:

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I folded the top over to make a casing, and finished it with an adjustable neck strap as I had the eyelet jabots.  I wasn’t terribly pleased with this one.  I thought the lace looked messy, and the edges looked quite different as the lace twisted differently on either side.

On a whim, I tried making another one to use up the little piece of lace I had left, just sewing the lace straight down the center.  WOW!  Was that super easy and looked great!

So, Version 2, the 2nd attempt:

I started by taking a strip of white fabric and folding it around the piece of petticoat net.  I ran one row of zig-zag stitching up the center.  Then I trimmed off the excess petticoat net.

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I had  divided the bit of leftover scarf for the first one I made into three strips and that looked good, so I did the same for this one.  The don’t have to be exact, just in the ball park range.

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Sew the lace to the backing piece in parallel lines,making sure to catch the ends, so the crocheting doesn’t come undone.

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It looks like this on the back:

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Fold over the top to make a casing and add a neck strap . . and it is DONE!  For these I used narrow elastic, either with attached velcro, or tied in a simple knot.

Super easy and super  cute!

Keep your eyes open for an old lace scarf  . . . and buy several if you can.  Once you start making these, you’ll just want to keep going!

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2 thoughts on “Quick & Easy Jabots: Variations on a Theme

  1. I have never seen one of those lace scarves! The project looks great. I usually just cut several long rectangles and round off the bottom. Each rectangle is a little more narrow. Then I just gather down the center and it all ruffles up. I love your tiers of eyelet one also.

    Like

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